I have a recipe plug-in that has a print feature! Now you can print out the recipe without having to print out the entire blog post. The printable recipe is located at the bottom of the post. My admiration grows by leaps and bounds for food bloggers who prepare recipes everyday. I hope you enjoy this updated post and convenient print option.

Here is the recipe for those damn good molasses cookies. They are a culmination of our favorite things drawn from four different recipes. I have tinkered with this recipe for years, changing flour ratios, mixing spice blends, swapping one sugar for another, never seeming to get it just right, producing a good cookie, but elusive of that sigh of perfection. I remember texting Ryan a couple of weeks ago with a picture and telling him that I thought we had the “one.” I quick made him a batch and sent it off for final testing. “Fantastic” was the response, the texture finally right. Ryan has been key in honing the texture, I knew I could count on him for an honest answer. Doug would tell me that he needed to try just one more and wander off with a handful of them for further study.

Damn Good Molasses Cookies

3 Cups Bread Flour
1 Cup All Purpose Flour
2 tsp Baking Soda
2 1/2 tsp Ground Ginger
2 tsp Cinnamon
1 tsp Cloves
1 tsp Allspice
1/4 tsp Cardamom
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/2 cup butter, room temperature
1/2 cup Spectrum Shortening
1 cup brown sugar – light or dark
1/2 cup white sugar
2 whole eggs, plus one yolk
1/2 cup molasses
Coarse sparkling sugar
Take out the butter and eggs from fridge and let them come to room temperature, cold stuff does not play well together. I prep my dry ingredients first. Mom taught us to sift our spices, baking soda, and salt into a single cup of your flour, that flour with the sifted spices will be the first cup of dry ingredients introduced into your wet ingredients.
Measure one cup of bread flour into a small bowl to sift spices into.

Measure one cup of bread flour into a small bowl to sift spices into.

IMG_6575

We always lined up our spices on the left, when measured out, the jar went to the right, that way we knew we had added it in.

IMG_6583

Whisk flour and spices together until you have a nice blend. This will be the first cup of dry ingredients that you add to your wet ingredients.

 Cream the butter, shortening, and sugars together until they are light and fluffy, scraping down frequently, especially down at the bottom of your mixing bowl. Add eggs one by one, never all at once. Remember we are only using the yolk on the third egg. Reserve or freeze the egg white for another recipe.
Beautiful eggs from the farm. I use chicken eggs in cookie recipes.

Beautiful eggs from the farm. I use chicken eggs in cookie recipes.

Once the eggs and egg yolk are incorporated, add the molasses, the batter should be a lovely creamy caramel color.

Molasses in, ready for dry ingredients.

Molasses in, ready for dry ingredients.

Scrape down the mixing bowl, making sure you have scraped all the way down to the bottom. With the mixer on low add the single cup of flour that you sifted and whisked the spices into, I add it a tablespoon at a time – you don’t want to overwhelm all that lovely creaming that you have done. Add the rest of the flour slowly, don’t dump it in by the cupful. Take your time.

All the flour added in, ready to rest overnight.

All the flour added in, ready to rest overnight.

Once all the flour has been incorporated, scrape down your beaters and give it a stir by hand with a sturdy mixing spoon. Scoop the cookie dough into an airtight container so it can rest overnight in the refrigerator, it can even rest for two nights. The resting allows good things to happen to the dough.

I cover the dough with wax paper and then put the lid on the container. Place in the refrigerator for an overnight rest.

I cover the dough with wax paper and then put the lid on the container. Place in the refrigerator for an overnight rest.

When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees. I use parchment paper for baking, and prefer half sheet pans, that rim has saved many a batch of cookies from sliding off. I use a #40 cookie scoop, which is 1 1/2 tablespoons. Makes the perfect sized cookie. Scoop out a portion of cookie dough, give a quick roll to shape it, dip the top in coarse sparkling white sugar and place on parchment lined baking pan. I usually get 3 1/2 dozen cookies from a batch. Your numbers may be different depending on how large or small you make your cookies.

They make me smile.

They make me smile.

12 to a sheet

12 to a sheet

I bake mine for 10 minutes, then rotate the tray and bake them for two more minutes. I check them after two, it can be a little tricky. I touch one gently, there should be some resistance, but they should also look slightly underdone in the center – you don’t want too much give, that is under-cooked. But to keep them chewy and wonderful, you need to pull them at just the right time. I sometimes let a tray go another minute, sometimes 30 seconds. Once you have deemed them ready, let them cool on the baking pan on a cooling rack for at least 10 minutes.

They should look like this. All crackly and wonderful.

They should look like this. All crackly and wonderful.

I keep my dough refrigerated between batches and if I prep a tray to bake and the oven is occupied, I put that tray in the refrigerator. If your dough gets warm, you will get too much spread when baking.

Transfer them to a cooling rack and allow them to cool completely.

Transfer them to a cooling rack and allow them to cool completely.

 

Snuggled in a cookie tin.

Snuggled in a cookie tin.

These cookies are a tribute to the Norsemen in my life, my brothers, and to my mother. Thank you for the endless sampling and answering strange questions like “would you call the spices aggressive or assertive?”

May your homes be filled with peace.

Love, Terri

5 from 1 reviews
Damn Good Molasses Cookies
 
Author: 
Recipe type: Dessert
A soft and spicy molasses cookie that never disappoints.
Ingredients
  • 3 Cups Bread Flour
  • 1 Cup All Purpose Flour
  • 2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 2½ tsp Ground Ginger
  • 2 tsp Cinnamon
  • 1 tsp Cloves
  • 1 tsp Allspice
  • ¼ tsp Cardamom
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ½ cup butter, room temperature
  • ½ cup Spectrum Shortening
  • 1 cup brown sugar - light or dark
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • 2 whole eggs, plus one yolk
  • ½ cup molasses
  • Coarse Sparkling Sugar
Instructions
  1. Take the butter and eggs out of the fridge and let them come to room temperature, cold stuff does not play well together. I prep my dry ingredients first. Mom taught us to sift our spices, baking soda, and salt into a single cup of your flour, that flour with the sifted spices will be the first cup of dry ingredients introduced into your wet ingredients.
  2. Measure one cup of bread flour into a small bowl.
  3. We always lined up our spices on the left, when measured out, the jar went to the right, that way we knew which spices had been added.
  4. Whisk flour and spices together until you have a nice blend. This will be the first cup of dry ingredients that you add to your wet ingredients.
  5. Cream the butter, shortening, and sugars together until they are light and fluffy, scraping down frequently, especially down at the bottom of your mixing bowl. Add eggs one by one. Remember we are only using the yolk on the third egg. Reserve or freeze the egg white for another recipe.
  6. Once the eggs and egg yolk are incorporated, add the molasses, the batter should be a lovely creamy caramel color.
  7. Scrape down the mixing bowl, making sure you have scraped all the way down to the bottom. With the mixer on low add the single cup of flour that you sifted and whisked the spices into, I add it a tablespoon at a time - you don't want to overwhelm all that lovely creaming that you have done. Add the rest of the flour slowly, don't dump it in by the cupful. Take your time.
  8. Once all the flour has been incorporated, scrape down your beaters and give it a stir by hand with a sturdy mixing spoon. Scoop the cookie dough into an airtight container so it can rest overnight in the refrigerator, it can even rest for two nights. The resting allows good things to happen to the dough.
  9. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 350 degrees. I use parchment paper for baking, and prefer half sheet pans, that rim has saved many a batch of cookies from sliding off. I use a #40 cookie scoop, which is 1½ tablespoons. Makes the perfect sized cookie. Scoop out a portion of cookie dough, give a quick roll to shape it, dip the top in coarse sparkling white sugar and place on parchment lined baking pan. I usually get 3½ dozen cookies from a batch. Your numbers may be different depending on how large or small you make your cookies.
  10. I bake mine for 10 minutes, then rotate the tray and bake them for two more minutes. I check them after two, it can be a little tricky. I touch one gently, there should be some resistance, but they should also look slightly underdone in the center - you don't want too much give, that is under-cooked. But to keep them chewy and wonderful, you need to pull them at just the right time. I sometimes let a tray go another minutes, sometimes 30 seconds. Once you have deemed them ready, let them cool on the baking pan on a cooling rack for at least 10 minutes.
  11. I keep my dough refrigerated between batches and if I prep a tray to bake and the oven is occupied, I put that tray in the refrigerator. If your dough gets warm, you will get too much spread when baking.
  12. These cookies are a tribute to the Norsemen in my life, my brothers, and to my mother. Thank you for the endless sampling and answering strange questions like "would you call the spices aggressive or assertive?"

 

 

One thought on “Damn Good Molasses Cookies

  1. What a wonderful gift! Even more so in connection with your post from the day before. Thank you, Terri! Thanks too, for the little details and baking tips. It’s like getting to be in the kitchen and learn from you. I’m a novice, and my future cookie eaters will be much obliged. 🙂

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